April 27, 2012   13 notes
Amish Women Quilting, unknown photographer, 1981

Original caption:Sarasota, Fla.: Wearing the traditional Amish attire for women, a group of them holds a frontyard quilting party. Every place is a meeting place where anything from the state of the farm to the state of the union is likely to become a topic of conversation. Talk often turns to the young, a source of prude and of concern to these elders who rely upon their precious few to carry on the beliefs. Problems of alcohol and drugs, sadly common in the outside world, also have intruded into the Plain People’s society. These elements have added a frightening dimension to “sowing wild oats,” a phrase with youth which generally has been tolerated among Amish and Mennonites—so long as it is reasonably brief and followed by baptism into the church and responsible adulthood.

Amish Women Quilting, unknown photographer, 1981

Original caption:Sarasota, Fla.: Wearing the traditional Amish attire for women, a group of them holds a frontyard quilting party. Every place is a meeting place where anything from the state of the farm to the state of the union is likely to become a topic of conversation. Talk often turns to the young, a source of prude and of concern to these elders who rely upon their precious few to carry on the beliefs. Problems of alcohol and drugs, sadly common in the outside world, also have intruded into the Plain People’s society. These elements have added a frightening dimension to “sowing wild oats,” a phrase with youth which generally has been tolerated among Amish and Mennonites—so long as it is reasonably brief and followed by baptism into the church and responsible adulthood.

(Source: melissaleigh3, via plaindress)

January 2, 2012   27 notes

Freedom Quilt, Jessie B. Telfair, 1983,
from the collection of the American Folk Art Museum

Freedom Quilt, Jessie B. Telfair, 1983,

from the collection of the American Folk Art Museum

December 9, 2011   11 notes
Little Quilt, Ashley Anna Brown, c. 2011

Little Quilt, Ashley Anna Brown, c. 2011

December 8, 2011   15 notes

Turkey Palm, maker unknown, c. 1860

antique red and white patchwork quilt

(Source: etsy.com)

December 8, 2011   13 notes
Indian Five-Star, Mary Youngman, Sioux, 1968-1975
From the Smithsonian’s A Spectacular Collection of Native American Quilts
Please take the time to read the article!

Indian Five-Star, Mary Youngman, Sioux, 1968-1975

From the Smithsonian’s A Spectacular Collection of Native American Quilts


Please take the time to read the article!

December 8, 2011   16 notes
Arrow Shooting Into Star, Almira Buffalo Bone Jackson, Assiniboine,1968- 1988
From the Smithsonian’s A Spectacular Collection of Native American Quilts
Please take the time to read the article!

Arrow Shooting Into Star, Almira Buffalo Bone Jackson, Assiniboine,1968- 1988

From the Smithsonian’s A Spectacular Collection of Native American Quilts


Please take the time to read the article!

December 3, 2011   13 notes
String                      Plate Quilt, Ethel West Adair, Cherokee, c. 1945,
Oklahoma Cotton, 67” x 84.5”

Cherokee quiltmaker Ethel West Adair was born in 1901 in                        Wagner Prairie in what was then known as “Indian Territory.”                        She was married to Mack Adair Jr. for fifty-six years and                        had eight children who survived infancy. Her early life                        was spent in Oklahoma, where she later returned with her                        husband in retirement. In 1941 or 1942, Ethel moved to California,                        where she became a nurse’s aide. Following her husband’s                        death in 1986, Ethel moved to Arizona, and finally settled                        in California to be near her children. At her home in Oklahoma, Ethel had a ceiling frame that                        she could raise and lower for quilting. When the weather                        was warm, the frame was sometimes moved to a veranda. Many                        long hours creating family treasures were accumulated while                        at the frame. Ethel stitched quilts for all of her immediate                        family and many of her grandchildren.

String Plate Quilt, Ethel West Adair, Cherokee, c. 1945,

Oklahoma
Cotton, 67” x 84.5”

Cherokee quiltmaker Ethel West Adair was born in 1901 in Wagner Prairie in what was then known as “Indian Territory.” She was married to Mack Adair Jr. for fifty-six years and had eight children who survived infancy. Her early life was spent in Oklahoma, where she later returned with her husband in retirement. In 1941 or 1942, Ethel moved to California, where she became a nurse’s aide. Following her husband’s death in 1986, Ethel moved to Arizona, and finally settled in California to be near her children.
At her home in Oklahoma, Ethel had a ceiling frame that she could raise and lower for quilting. When the weather was warm, the frame was sometimes moved to a veranda. Many long hours creating family treasures were accumulated while at the frame. Ethel stitched quilts for all of her immediate family and many of her grandchildren.

December 2, 2011   14 notes
americanroutes:

A quilt by Laverne Brackens, an improvisatory quilter and a 2011 National Heritage Fellow. She represents the fourth generation of a family of quiltmakers.
Ms. Brackens was interviewed on-stage by Nick at this year’s NEA National Heritage Fellowship Concert; listen to the clip here.
[Photo by Eli Leon]

americanroutes:

A quilt by Laverne Brackens, an improvisatory quilter and a 2011 National Heritage Fellow. She represents the fourth generation of a family of quiltmakers.

Ms. Brackens was interviewed on-stage by Nick at this year’s NEA National Heritage Fellowship Concert; listen to the clip here.

[Photo by Eli Leon]

December 2, 2011   80 notes
future-reference:

Another Gee’s Bend quilt.
alderrr:

via www.gregkucera.com

future-reference:

Another Gee’s Bend quilt.

alderrr:

via www.gregkucera.com